Alter your perspective

This is another post in my ongoing series on the individual chapters in “The Obstacle is the Way.” I don’t know how useful or interesting it will be out of context.


This is the first chapter in The Obstacle is the Way that didn’t really blow me away. The fundamental lesson seems like it can be summed up very briefly: how you look at things changes the way you react to them. And, either I haven’t properly internalized how profound that is, or it’s not Earth-shaking news following up on the previous chapters.

I get this. I was frustrated yesterday because I tried twice to make a sort of explainer video for the worksheet project. Both times, the webcame video didn’t record. (And I even put on a nice shirt for the occasion.)

I already said I was frustrated. I didn’t have time for a third run-through before work.

But, on the other hand, I had two great rehearsals. In the first, there were a few minor things that frustrated me. (I wanted it seamless, and there were a few vocabulary that didn’t have definitions in the system when I made it, to there were about two minutes of me entering vocab.) And the second one was smoother and much shorter.

When I get around to recording the same thing today, I expect it to be tighter, shorter. And that’s valuable.

I probably would not have, on my own, run through the whole video twice in preparation, but the whole webcam-not-recording thing upped the quality of the finished product.

That’s changing the perspective, according to the book. The obstacle itself cannot be changed. The idea seems to be that changing your perspective doesn’t necessarily change the amount of work you have to do, it changes your perception of the work, and that can be enough.

I’ll finish this with the two paragraphs that finish the chapter:

How we interpret the events in our lives, our perspective, is the framework for our forthcoming response–whether there will even be one or whether we’ll just lie there and take it.

Where thehead goes, the body follows. Perception precedes action. Right action follows the right perspective.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s