The Discipline of Action

We’re finally getting to the action section of the book. The perception section did seem as though it were getting repetitive, didn’t it?

This chapter starts with the story of Demosthenes, an ancient Greek orator who was orphaned young, had his inheritance stolen, was sickly… and went on to become a great orator. The story runs over a bit more than a page and is well told, but this paragraph sums it up:

Sure, Demosthenes lost the inheritance he’d been born with, and that was unfortunate. But in the process of dealing with this reality, he creted a far better one–one that could never be taken from him.

The first part of the chapter seems to be dedicated to one lesson: don’t feel sorry for yourself, get busy.

The second part of the chapter is less narrative (not as many stories) and more an inspirational speech for action, and, as the chapter draws to an end, for right action. (After all, action for action’s sake will most likely not work.)

[Fun aside, as I’m writing this, I’m waiting for SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy to launch. It’s been postponed, and in the meantime, I watched this video on the 5-year delay on the Falcon Heavy. One of the lessons I took from that video was the idea that SpaceX was wise to postpone the Falcon Heavy in order to take advantage of design improvements in the Falcon 9. It makes sense, and it’s the first thing that popped into my head when talking about right action.]

At the end of the chapter, right action is defined a bit more narrowly, and a rhetorical question is asked:

Therefore, we can always (and only) greet our obstacles

  • with energy
  • with peristence
  • with a coherent and deliberate process
  • with iteration and resilience
  • with pragmatism
  • with strategic vision
  • with craftiness and savvy
  • and an eye for opportunity and pivotal moments

Are you ready to get to work?

Isn’t that a great way to end a chapter? Why did I make the mistake of tagging a bit more on at the end?

An over-abundance of action, I suppose.

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