What I could have done differently

The situation now

It’s not that long ago that I started making a plan to introduce my classroom vocab manager and worksheet generator to the world of teaching. And, I’m starting to see success. Both of the websites that I established are starting to show traffic every day.

What’s more, I can see that people are clicking through to Dynamic-EFL.com. That’s exactly what I wanted.

But very few of those people are signing up for a free trial. And, so far, none of the ones who have clicked through have made a worksheet with it.

It makes me think.

I have two thoughts on the whole thing.

Maybe I need to explain it better

I worry that I don’t sufficiently explain what the software does. Or, perhaps, that I over-explain it. After all, I already totally get what the software does and why it’s amazing.

Perhaps more images and fewer big blocks of text? Perhaps a better video walkthrough?

There’s a lot I could do to make it better, but, it’s a whole extra challenge.

Maybe it’s a numbers game

I’ve probably had about a hundred strangers look at the site since I started really trying. That’s not a lot of people. Ideally, it will be more and more with time, as the whole strategy of sharing static resources to attract teachers pays out.

But, maybe I just need to accept that I need to get x number of eyeballs on the site for each person that’s going to sign up. And maybe I have to accept that it’s going to be y number of people who are willing to sign up for each person who invests the time to really understand what it does.

Most likely, it’s both

I mean, I probably could make it more clear what people do. (And maybe break the explanation out across several pages, so that Google Analytics will be more of a help seeing what people are interested in)

And it’s probably the case that great explanations and onboarding can only reduce the values of x and y from (from the numbers game section), not turn every visitor into a conversion.

The plan for the near future

Believe it or not, my plan is to not do much. Sure, I might re-work the landing page(s). But, I think I’m at a point where I need to trust that some people are going to like the service. I’ve recommended it to colleagues (who promise to have a look when they have time) and I’m spreading the word on LinkedIn.

Now that I’m getting excited about the Fantasy Pilgrimage idea, I’d like to start directing my creative coding energy in that direction. So, until I have a handful of users who are willing to provide feedback so that I’m not longer just guessing at things, I don’t plan to mess around with the code of the worksheet generator very much. (Though I may make it possible to create and distribute ‘coupon codes’ that extend the free trial, in order to create a sense of urgency for the people who use the site.)

Until then, I think it’s time to let the site try to prove its own worth.

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The trouble with Google Analytics

I have a small problem with Google Analytics. And, to be fair, a part of that problem is me. And I’m sorry.

A while back, I set up a Google Analytics tracking tag across the entire site for the entire site. Then, I set a reminder to look at the data later. After all, there’s no sense in obsessing, right? However, as the sites I have set up as a sort of funnel to the worksheet generator start to get traffic (and as I continue to invest energy into drawing attention to them)

Here’s a brief reflection on what has been hard for me, as well as how I hope to improve it.

It’s overwhelming

I’m very confident that ninety percent of the traffic to my site right now comes from me. That said, when I log in to the page, I’m overwhelmed by data and it’s really hard to pick apart which data is mine and which comes from someone else.

This is compounded by my next challenge.

I did a bad job with URLs

When I was setting up the URLs of the site in Django, it just seemed easier to include a lot of information in the URL itself. So, my site has a lot of things like ‘/group/<id>/’ as a URL, where the individual group number is a part of the URL.

It hasn’t been a problem until now, but now it means that each group shows up as its own URL in the analytics report. That creates a lot of noise for me to try and pick through as I try to see how people who are not me interact with the site.

Even more, once others are using the site more, it’ll make it hard to see how people who aren’t me are actually using it as a product.

What I’m doing now

Google enables you to set up goals in analytics. I didn’t bother with that before, but I’ve established two different goals:

  • People click through to begin the signup process. I often check what the site will ask of me before I use it. It would be nice to know how well my site is leading people to that opportunity.
  • People making it to the end of the signup process. Obviously, this is my ‘real goal.’ But, as nobody seems to be doing it, it would be nice to have it recorded when they do. Even more, it would be nice to see what path leads them there.

I’m hoping that Google will not only record how often these goals are ‘achieved,’ but also separate that traffic out from the rest. Where does it come from? What do they click on beforehand?

What I’ll do with my next site

Based on my experience with analytics so far, I think I’ll consider them more in designing the URLs of my site. I’m starting to consider work on the Fantasy Pilgrimage idea and I think that I’ll include more in the query string than in the URL.

Adding things like group numbers (or, in my case, the UUID of specific vocabulary words) in the URL means that each user visits their own specific subset of URLs. Moving them to a query string would mean that each user visits the same URLs and the analytics could give me a more generalized overview of the way users interact with my site.

 

Sharing to attract teachers

So, after reflecting on my strategy to introduce the EFL worksheet generator to the world, now seems like a decent time to reflect on how it’s going.

My blog for EFL teachers is slowly coming together. It turns out I have more to say that I realized, and the act of reflecting in a deliberate way has helped me feel more confident as a teacher. So, either way, that’s a win.

Recently, I pushed myself to write a post on how to use reading activities in EFL classrooms, because I have a lot of EFL reading worksheets that I can share. (I hadn’t planned for there to be so many links in this page. Is it good SEO? Bad?)

The idea is simple. I started at ISLCollective.com, a site for teachers to share worksheets they’ve made. There aren’t many reading worksheets for adults (which is why I made my own, but also a chance for me to stand out) so I figured I’d cross-post some there.

After adding a second page to the worksheets that begins with “Hello teachers! (Do not print this page)” I introduced myself and included links to the post on how I incorporate reading in the lesson, as well as to the website hosting them. And, after two days, they’ve been downloaded more than a hundred times and I’ve had my first click-throughs to my blog.

Sure, it’s only two, but it’s two more than I had.

Now, I rationalize I can post the beginning of another series of stories (I have two, at two different reading levels, at the moment). And, because there are a lot of things that are not available for download, as I make them for myself, I can post them as a way to attract more people.

After writing all this — there is a genuine benefit to thinking in writing — I realize that I should also be making resources to help new teachers organize and think about their lessons. (New teachers are the people I’m trying to attract.)

I just checked at ISLCollective and there are a total of seven downloads available as ‘teacher training material.’

I guess I know what I need to do.

A business case

TLDR: The long and random argument I make to myself about why I’m going to start putting energy and resources into promoting something that could be stamped finished.


Time to make a decision

I’ve been thinking about my EFL worksheet generator. The thing is this: it does what I want, now. Almost exactly how I want it to.

I could declare it finished. That’s a crazy idea to me.

And yet, is it amazing if I’m the only one who knows it’s amazing? What’s more, ever since I decided to move the thing to the internet, as opposed to making the desktop interface better, I’m paying hosting costs. Not a ton of money, but much more than I would pay for a website like ESL Library.

Should I move it back offline?

I’m asking myself these questions because I’ve realized that this will never be a completely finished project. I’m taking a Udemy full-stack bootcamp, because there are ways the interface could be more amazing.

But, as I started looking into how to promote a web page, and even paying money to experiment with AdWords, I realized I wasn’t sure that was what I wanted to do. Am I the kind of person who gets excited about making and then promoting something? It doesn’t feel like who I am: I’ve never really felt comfortable saying “look at me!”

At the same time, it’s clear that “if you build it, they will come” is not a great strategy to follow.

So, I have to pick a future for the project.

The case against monetization

There are three big arguments against pursuing monetization. First, is the fact that I’m not really opposed to monetizing the website, it’s the fact that I’m opposed to investing a lot of energy promoting it. It’s just that I don’t think I can have one without the other. (Well, I could try and promote it without monetizing it, but then I’d be increasing my workload for… I’m not sure what for. Ego?)

The second argument against the whole thing is that I’m not sure it fits into my sense of who I am. I like the idea of being a “maker.” It’s a cool title and one I feel like I can give myself. There’s something existentially satisfying about having an idea and turning it into a reality.

Marketing, on the other hand, doesn’t feel like who I am. Or, I’ve never looked up to people who are great at promotion. The title “promoter,” to my ears, doesn’t sound quite the same as the title “maker.”

The last argument is time. I want to learn Latin. I want to work on other projects. Some of them are already pretty fleshed out as ideas. And, the worksheet generator is threatening to turn into a project that will take over my existence. Some of the things I considered doing as part of promoting it include:

  • Continuing to prioritize making free EFL materials.
  • Starting a blog focused on EFL teachers in Germany, to promote the site.
  • Making online tools to automatically generate materials from a text. (Copy-and-paste text from a company’s website to get a gapfill exercise prepared.)
  • Making a YouTube channel

The thing is, any of those could become a time-suck. Trying to do a combination of those and perhaps also paying for promotion… Well, it would require me to make a lot more money off the site to make it worthwhile.

The argument for monetization

On the other hand, as things stand now, the site doesn’t ‘feel’ finished, because nobody uses it. If someone told me he was proud of the site he’d made, but he was the only one who used it, I don’t know if I’d be as impressed with that person as I am with myself right now.

What’s more, a lot of the things I want to make are web-based. If they all incur costs, is there a point if I don’t know how to attract users? Why work hard to make the next site, if it’s just going to be a tool that I use on my own?

And, further, I could use the money. Not in the Elon Musk the-rest-of-my-career-is-a-working-retirement kind of way, but in the more modest what-will-I-do-if-I’m-ever-too-sick-to-work-for-more-than-a-week kind of way. A passive income would go a long way towards stability.

That brings me to the last argument for monetization (and the stress of promotion): I don’t want to be a career coder. I love making stuff, but I don’t think I could bear the frustration of coding just for the joy of coding well. The fun, to me, is in turning a dream of my own into a reality. I’m getting better at all this (though, by no means good), but I wouldn’t want to wind up in a spot where I have to go look for a job as a novice coder in my 40s, in Germany.

That means that, if I’m going to keep doing this, I’m going to be responsible for building entire projects, from start to finish. And, well, by that standard, the website isn’t finished. If I want to make an app to use in the classroom, or the fantasy pilgrimage website, all of these things will only work if I can both make, and sell them.

The business case

Here’s the last bit of reasoning: What would it mean for the website to be worth my while? By which I mean money. How much money means “this is why I do all this extra work?”

Obviously, there isn’t a maximum, but €500/month would mean I could quit one of my jobs and reduce the number of hours I have to work. That’s 50 people willing to pay €10/month for the service. Or, 71 people willing to pay a discounted price (if there’s a €10/month, €90/year kind of option).

Needless to say, I think those are great prices for what the site does (and for the amount of work I do making it work).

I haven’t been able to find out how many people teach English to adults in Germany, but I’m confident that there are at least 50 in Dresden. So, if I focus on the German market… the business case is compelling.

It’s compelling if I can learn how to communicate about what I do, and why it’s great.