The €1,439.84 workout

I just had a workout for almost one and a half thousand Euros, and believe me: I can still feel it in my legs.

With time, I’d like to feel the workout less, and to get the cost down. Let me explain:

Why a new workout?

I love my running. But, I don’t feel like it’s enough. So, I’ve experimented with various workouts though the years, and I’ve posted about a bunch of them here. (For example: the burpee project and, most recently, an at-home ninja warrior workout.)

Nothing has stuck the way running has stuck. And nothing has made me look forward to the workout the way running did. So, yes, I did find myself doing more burpees in a set or feeling stronger while carrying my kids around… but I didn’t feel success.

Then I read a book…

As with so many things in my life: I got an idea reading a book. The book was recommended by my family for at least a year, but I didn’t think of myself as the kind of person who read books about sports. And rowing? It’s not for me.

Still, whenever I mentioned needing something to read, everyone recommended “The Boys in the Boat.” It’s the story of a Washington University rowing team that, in spite of some unsportsmanlike conduct both in the U.S. during qualifying and in the Olympics, went on to win the gold medal.

It’s a story of the adversity of coming of age in the depression, as well as sticking it to the Nazis? How could I not be enthralled.

(An aside: this is further proof that, when someone you admire recommends a book, you should consider that book. When more than one person recommends the book, go and buy it!)

I found myself watching things like this:

And, all the while, admiring the boys and enjoying the adventure. Each chapter started with a poetic and inspiring observation by George Pocock, who made shells in the boathouse of Washington University. I found myself thinking: I would like to discover in myself some small part of what these young men found in rowing.

Enter the rowing machine

That’s why today’s workout was so expensive. On Saturday, I bought a rowing machine, with limited accessories for €1,439.84. It wasn’t entirely spontaneous: I spent some time researching rowing and rowing machines online. I know myself well enough to know that I wouldn’t want to be the beginner in a 40-and-up rowing crew where the other members have been rowing for the last twenty years.

After assembling the machine–it was a fair bit of work, and, more than once, I had to go back and add washers to bolts that I forgot to add them to–I went though a “your first workout” video which focused more on form and how to sit on the machine. So, though I did about ten minutes of rowing and definitely felt it yesterday, I’m not counting it as a workout on my running costs (see below).

Today, I did this workout focused on the catch, and, feeling that ten minutes wasn’t enough–we’ll see if aching muscles tomorrow tell me otherwise–I added this one as well. After all, when you pay over a thousand euros for a workout, you want it to last more than ten minutes.

Running costs…

I’m intimidated by the amount of money I spent. However, if it keeps me sane–or is even a major factor contributing to my sanity–it’s worth it. There are some factors that I think make it worth the investment:

  • It’s at home, I don’t have to invest time in travel to go anywhere.
  • My kids can see me doing it. That means that I’m a role model, but also that they can say they’d like to give it a try. They’ve all been on it a little. Further, it’s something that the oldest has mentioned as a way to help him manage his blood sugar.
  • It’s something I start and then do all the way through, requiring willpower only once. I’d found myself delaying between exercises when I did other workouts and taxing my willpower over and over again to get things done.
  • It should hold it’s value. I’m reasonably confident that, if I don’t get into it, I’ll be able to sell it for at least a thousand Euros and be four hundred Euros smarter. We’ll see. If I do, I’ll adjust my running costs.

As a motivation, I’m keeping track of the number of workouts I do and trying to get myself to lower the cost of each individual workout. So, this first workout cost the whopping thousand four hundred euros but, as soon as I do another workout on Wednesday, the cost of each workout sinks to €719.92.

My long-term goal is €2/workout (720 workouts), but next I’m aiming at €143.99 (10 workouts).

We will see…

Burpee Challenge: Reflections and reboot

The idea of my burpee challenge is pretty old. I began training for it back in August, and finally started the project in September. In the very first week, I missed a day, and–without posting here–figured I’d restart the one-week challenge.

I managed three weeks on the terms of getting a total of 300 burpees per week (50 burpees per day for six days). I missed the occasional day, but then did two sets the next day. Once, I even managed a long, drawn-out set of a hundred.

I got stronger. I began to enjoy the middle few burpees–after warming up, before beginning to be exhausted–and started wondering what I would do after the challenge. After all, this doesn’t seem like something that would turn into a lifestyle.

Then, last week got crazy and I missed three days. I kept the running tally of the burpees I still had to do, but realized I wasn’t going to catch up.

So, because the challenge is six weeks of six days, I’m starting again. I’m not giving up, yet. There is something to be gained from the burpees, and I’m enjoying the feeling of strength I get from them.

So, here we go again…

The burpee project begins!

I decided that September would start the burpee project. For a while, I was pretty consistent with fifty burpees a day — at least every other day — but told myself that I was just warming up.

At some point, however, it seems logical that the experiment had to begin. And, with September starting on a Sunday, that seemed like a happy coincidence. The burpee experiment starts in September.

Here it is:

  • 50 burpees per day
  • 6 days a week
  • (Or the equivalent)
  • 6 weeks

What’s an equivalent?

To give myself some flexibility, the basic goal is 300 burpees per week. I’ll count a week as successful if I do three days at 100 burpees each. Or even if I do 300 burpees in one day (not today, thank you!).

The idea here is that I am afraid I’ll miss a day and then lose motivation because I “screwed everything up.” So, this gives me the chance to fix my mistakes.

Starting data

I should have timed myself doing 50 burpees. I haven’t, but now that I’m writing, that seems like the kind of data that would be interesting to keep track of. I do know that I was 106.9 kg at the beginning of this week and that I’m both eating and drinking less than usual at the moment. It’s a little unfortunate, because it will be hard to know if the burpees or the reduced calorie intake has the most impact.

Nonetheless, I look forward to seeing the data at the end.

The burpee experiment

I have an infatuation with burpees. Along with pull-ups and rope climbing, they’re the exercise that has the most mystique. In fact, maybe I like them most because I can actually do at least a few burpees at a time. (I can do a single pull-up, I cannot climb a rope… the kids play on the one I hung in the tree outside.)

A month or so ago, I watched this video.

You can guess what happened.

Naturally I didn’t think I was up for kicking into fifty burpees a day right away. I’m getting older and I’m very afraid of hurting myself. But I did go right out and do a total of fifty burpees in who knows how many sets.

And I felt it the next day, just like I expected to.

So I took a day off. And I started writing down when I did the burpees.

It felt good to see the list grow and occasionally calculate how many I’d done in total.

Being on vacation, burpees were a great exercise to feel like I was getting something done without checking out from the family for an hour for a long run (with the consequence that I now have to break back into running).

My goal: Do fifty burpees six times a week for six weeks, starting in September. I’ve had goals like this before, but we’ll see.

Every day is better than occasionally

This might seem like an obvious statement to make — especially regarding fitness — but I’ve learned that every day is better than three or four times per week.

I’m still not in a routine that ‘just fits’ or a routine that I can’t imagine not doing. I’d like to get there, but, for me, exercise is a thing that I consciously choose to do because I know what it can do for me afterward.

And I struggle with making it a routine.

Enter, the idea of every day. For a while now, I’ve been using a 4-week challenge app on my phone as my ‘strength training.’ In fact, I’m restarting the challenge for the second time (I’ve been through it at the first to levels of difficulty.)

My January activity

You don’t need to open a dictionary to know that ‘every day’ means something different from what I accomplished in January. But, in January exercising four times a week — my old stretch goal — was a bad week.

I think that counts for something.

Even more, I’ve been feeling the changes to my own body, which is a nice thing to be able to report.

I still have the beer belly (“gas tank for a sex machine!”) that I want to get rid of, and I’m not pushing the scale much. But, when I hold my increasingly heavy kids, I can feel my core is stronger. Back pain has become so rare that, when it does rear its ugly head, I almost always realize “hmm, yeah, I haven’t exercised this week like I should.” (And that means that there’s a sort of positive-reward cycle that encourages me to exercise.)

In fact, as I’m going through the challenge again for the third and last time, I’m starting to wonder where I’m going to find my next every-day workout routine. The app I’m using (here, in the Google Store) offers workouts tailored to individual muscle groups “shoulders and back” and “chest and arms” or whatever. So, that’s the logical starting point, but I’ve been enjoying the simplicity of knowing that I have to free up a bit of time, start the app, and just do what it says.

So, we’ll see what happens when I ‘graduate’ out of the challenge.

I do get a bit of motivation out of these stats… 1100 minutes (18 hours)