Sharing to attract teachers

So, after reflecting on my strategy to introduce the EFL worksheet generator to the world, now seems like a decent time to reflect on how it’s going.

My blog for EFL teachers is slowly coming together. It turns out I have more to say that I realized, and the act of reflecting in a deliberate way has helped me feel more confident as a teacher. So, either way, that’s a win.

Recently, I pushed myself to write a post on how to use reading activities in EFL classrooms, because I have a lot of EFL reading worksheets that I can share. (I hadn’t planned for there to be so many links in this page. Is it good SEO? Bad?)

The idea is simple. I started at ISLCollective.com, a site for teachers to share worksheets they’ve made. There aren’t many reading worksheets for adults (which is why I made my own, but also a chance for me to stand out) so I figured I’d cross-post some there.

After adding a second page to the worksheets that begins with “Hello teachers! (Do not print this page)” I introduced myself and included links to the post on how I incorporate reading in the lesson, as well as to the website hosting them. And, after two days, they’ve been downloaded more than a hundred times and I’ve had my first click-throughs to my blog.

Sure, it’s only two, but it’s two more than I had.

Now, I rationalize I can post the beginning of another series of stories (I have two, at two different reading levels, at the moment). And, because there are a lot of things that are not available for download, as I make them for myself, I can post them as a way to attract more people.

After writing all this — there is a genuine benefit to thinking in writing — I realize that I should also be making resources to help new teachers organize and think about their lessons. (New teachers are the people I’m trying to attract.)

I just checked at ISLCollective and there are a total of seven downloads available as ‘teacher training material.’

I guess I know what I need to do.

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The To-Do List

This seems like a pretty big project to me. So big, in fact, that I’m ready to bring in outside help: I’ve already contacted an illustrator and asked if she would be willing to do the illustrations, should I send her a proof-of-concept that she finds convincing. The answer was a “yes,” but a tentative one.

So, outside of the ‘simple’ act of coding, I see several things for me to be working on:

  • Defining what a ‘success’ will be in this project. It has to be more than just a working app, as I don’t think I can afford to pay an illustrator just to prove that I can make the app. And I certainly can’t expect her to work without some sort of reward. What are we working towards?
  • Deciding if this thing is going to cost money? That’s obviously a subset of whether or not I want it to make me money, or if I’m doing all this just to prove that I’m cooler than the next guy. (Still a worthwhile goal, but is it enough?)
  • Researching how to get my app in front of a few eyeballs. I get that it can get lost in the Play Store, but how do I get the people who would be interested in it to see it?

I genuinely love the idea of seeing an idea that I had realized. Sure, it’s not something physical in the traditional sense, that I can frame and put up on the wall. But, nonetheless, it would be something I could point to and say “See that? I had that idea and I made it happen.”

On the other hand, I sense that success is going to require more than just a finished project. And the idea of marketing my idea, of being forced to try and convince people to look at what I made, well, that’s the part of this project that I’m looking forward to the least. Forget the tedium of trying to figure out why my code isn’t doing what I think it should be doing, this will be the hardest part of the project for me.

And that means it’s the part that I need to work the hardest on.