Anticipation (Thinking Negatively)

This chapter (in my continuing The Obstacle is the Way series) begins with an inscription from the oracle at Delphi:

Offer a guarantee and disaster threatens.

(Fun aside: I’d always heard that “Know yourself” was inscribed at Delphi. Realizing that there were other inscriptions lead me to this page.)

The core of this chapter is fairly straightforward: plan for things to wrong as much as you plan for things to go right, and you won’t be disappointed.

But, it’s a full chapter and it does include one reference to Seneca worth recording here.

…like all great ideas, it is actually nothing new. The credit goes to the Stoics. They even had a better name: premaditatio malorum (premeditation of evils).

A writer like Seneca would begin by reviewing or rehearsing his plans, say, to take a trip. And then he would go over, in his head (or in writing), the things that could go wrong or prevent it from happening: a storm could arise, the captian could fall ill, the ship could be attacked by pirates.

“Nothing happes to the wise man against his expectations,” he wrote to a friend. “… nor do all things turn out for him as hi wished but as he reckoned — and above all he recokend that something could block his plans.”

A good part of the chapter is reiterating that this premeditation of evils does not mean that the evils will be easy to bear, but that we are at least spared a shock and have the chance to prepare our ‘playbook’ before the emotional time of confronting a disaster.

I liked this chapter. It matches to me well, and to where I am. And, I like that there was reference to the process of thinking in writing (which is, basically, what this blog is).

So, maybe I’ll sit down and wrote a blog post as a premeditation of evils.

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